Sunday, December 3, 2017

Book Review: Kermit the Hermit by Bill Peet



Stars: 5 out of 5
Pros: Good moral wrapped in an entertaining story
Cons: None
The Bottom Line:
Kermit stops hoarding
We see generosity
Entertaining book




The Generous Hermit (Crab)

One thing I appreciate about Bill Peet is that his characters really are good.  I can only think of one character in one book that turns out to be all bad.  So even when you meet Kermit the Hermit, you know that he will have a change of heart before the book is over.

You see, Kermit is a hermit crab living in Monterey Bay.  He has a crevice in a rock that he calls home, and he has filled it full of things he finds valuable.  He spends his day looking for more treasures and trying to keep others from taking stuff from his stash.

One day, his searching takes him to the sand, where a dog gets a hold of him and starts digging a hole.  Kermit is saved for a horrible fate by a boy who is walking on the beach.  Kermit immediately searches for something he can do for the boy.  How will this change him?

Obviously, there is a moral to this story about the joys of being generous.  We actually get to see quite a transformation in Kermit, and that’s a great thing.  In fact, adults will probably pick up on how the details make this a strong parable.  But the best part is that we aren’t preached at.  Instead, this transformation because of one kind act is actually what drives the story, so we are entertained the entire time.

Bill Peet’s illustrations are always wonderful, and this book is no exception.  They are full color and contain plenty of detail.

This is one of the books that Bill Peet wrote in verse.  Since I have no ability to write poetry at all, I am in awe of those who can and make it look so effortless.  This book isn’t an easy reader, but it would be a good step in an early reader’s life since the verse might help them figure out what some unfamiliar words are.

Kermit the Hermit is another example of Bill Peet’s wonderful storytelling.  It’s a shame he isn’t as popular as he used to be.  Try this book today, and you’ll definitely treasure it.

3 comments:

  1. Our youngest son's very favorite picture book is The Pinkish, Purplish, Bluish Egg by Bill Peet. We read that book so many, many times. Now as an adult and father himself, he and his family give the book away to friends who have babies to build their own library at home. Bill Peet is as you said, "a wonderful storyteller!"

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    1. Sorry, forgot to leave my name...LibraryLady aka judy!

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